Kenton Little & Jeff Spot Interviews

By Brier Stucky

​Interviews with Kenton Little, director of the short film Tone, and Jeff Spot, director of the short film Ode to Oysters.

Kenton Little, director of Tone:

1. What inspired you to make this short film?
The original reason I made this short was for my advanced video class, but I wanted to make something I would actually enjoy making too. Music is a big part of my life, so I wanted to incorporate that into my other passion as well.

2. What makes this short film special and/or meaningful to you?
I kind of wrote the main character based off of myself, in the way that he relates with his father through music. My father was the person who really got me listening and interested in music, and we share a special bond because of that. I threw in Rush’s Fly by Night album in the stack of records as a sort of tribute to that. Rush was the first rock and roll music he introduced me to, and subsequently was the first album he bought me as well.

3. What is the significance of your films title Tone and how does it relate to the film’s story?
When you watch the film, the title becomes self-explanatory. Throughout most of the film, the only sound you here is a low droning tone, representing the depression the main character is dealing with at the time.

4. Were there any challenges in making this short film?
The main challenges I dealt with during the making of this short were getting the color effects to look right. There was a lot of time put into each frame to get it looking good. It’s still not as good as I’d like it to be, but for a first try at something like that I can’t complain too much.

5. What would you like viewers to take away from this short film?
I would like the viewers to be able to relate with the main character the most. Even if they haven’t experienced such a tragic situation, I would like them to be able to empathize with the main character.

Jeff Spott, director of Ode to Oysters:

1. What inspired you to make this short film?
The music video, “Ode to Oysters”, was brought into creation during a music video contest for Cardinal Filmworks during the 2015 Spring Semester.

2. What makes this short film special and/or meaningful to you?
From the story point of view, this video is meaningful to me because I have gone through heart breaks in past relationships before as I am positive many others have as well.  From the production point of view, I loved this music video because none of the cast and crew knew each other before production, but since the completion of the video we have gained more production skills and have all remained good friends.

3. What is the significance of your films title Tone and how does it relate to the film’s story?
According to Jon Engel, one of the writers of Ode to Oysters, the song was given the name due to how “oysters make pearls and the pearls are a reference to a women’s smile that we see when we close our eyes.”  This relates to the story filmed as the young man is torn apart from his recent break up with the young woman, however he is stuck with the memory of her.

4. Were there any challenges in making this short film?
The challenge of making this music video were that we were given only two weeks for the Cardinal Filmworks contest, therefore we were on a time crunch to storyboard, film, and edit.  And on top of that, we had to work around the 6 cast and crew member’s schedules.

5. What would you like viewers to take away from this short film?
After watching this video, we want our audience to know that you don’t have to be professionals to make a video with a good story.  Just have some TCOM kids with some passion.